Scott Adkins kicks ass in Outer Space in “Incoming”!

Posted in Uncategorized on March 28, 2017 by Michael S. Moore


That’s right, Scott Adkins is tired of whooping ass on planet Earth. It’s time to crack some heads in space. I am stoked as hell for this, and low budget or no, I gonna rock this film when it comes out. It all about zero-G asskickery, everyone. Check out the press release below!

LOS ANGELES (March 28, 2017) – Scott Adkins (Doctor Strange, The Expendables 2) is set to star in the new sci-fi action thriller INCOMING from prolific indie producers Benattar/Thomas Productions. Production is underway in Belgrade, Serbia.

XLrator Media will distribute the film in North America. Foreign sales will be handled by Premiere Entertainment Group. The film is financed by the UK’s Sharp House.

INCOMING marks the feature directorial debut of longtime Benattar/Thomas collaborator Eric “Z” Zaragoza and is written by Jorge Saralegui, based on an original story by Rick Benattar, Nigel Thomas and Jorge Saralegui.

The International Space Station is now a prison — the ultimate black site. No one’s getting out. And no one knows it’s there. But when the imprisoned terrorists take over the Station and turn it into a missile aimed at Moscow, only a shuttle pilot and a rookie doctor can stop them. Their task is complicated by a rogue CIA agent (Adkins) who has his own plans for the station and the terrorists within.

Producers are Rick Benattar and Nigel Thomas. Premiere’s Elias Axume also serves as producer as does Milos Dukelic of Belgrade production service company, Red Production. Executive producers are XLrator Media’s Barry Gordon and Michael Radiloff, and Sharp House’s Ian Sharp, Rebecca Joerin-Sharp and Emma Dutton.

Scott Adkins’ deal was negotiated by Joe Hutton of London’s BWH Agency and Brett Norensberg at Gersh. 

“We’re thrilled to be working with Scott on this exciting new project. It’s a science fiction film but rooted in the realities of our world today. It explores familiar themes and looks at what could be our world in the not-too-distant future,” said producer Rick Benattar.

“We are excited to work with Scott Adkins again after our collaboration on CLOSE RANGE. He is one of the best action heroes and martial artists in the world today,” said XLrator Media CEO Barry Gordon.

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Bryan Sloyer has a trick up his sleeve with The Magician! (2017)

Posted in Amy Sturdivant, Bryan Sloyer, Jay Kwon, Jerry Quill with tags , on March 23, 2017 by Michael S. Moore

Directed by Bryan Sloyer

Fight Choreography by Bryan Sloyer.

Starring Jay Kwon, Jerry Quill, Amy Sturdivant, Bryan Sloyer, Kiera O’Connor, Katie O’Donovan, Kyle Potter,  Trevor Logan, Andrew Franklin, Narayana Cabral, Allen Quindiagan, Yoshi Sudarso, Mark Miscione, Graham Hooper, Lee Chesley, Yavuz Topuz, Armand Rabanal, Nick Krawiec, Jonathan Wong Just Vancho

 

Bryan Sloyer does it again. He’s really growing as a filmmaker/stuntman right before our eyes. I think it’s only a matter of time for this guy to get a feature film, and I would be the first in line for it! This film, takes place in a single room, but I guarantee you can’t take your eyes off of it. The camera work is tremendous, particularly with the “magic” tricks the fighters pull off. Major props to all involved! The action is fluid despite the camera cuts, and has a great flow. Such an original way to approach a fight scene. I need to watch this again. So you do. Click, watch, pick up jaw, repeat.

 

Kiai-Kick’s Grade: 10

It’s that good, everyone. Sloyer keeps on raising his own bar. And it’s a glorious thing to see.

Donnie Yen is Wei Shen in Sleeping Dogs!!

Posted in Donnie Yen on March 3, 2017 by Michael S. Moore

As if the film gods answered my prayers, an adaptation of one of, If not my favorite game of the PS3/Xbox era, and was a perfect homage to Chinese action cinema, particularly martial arts films, wrapped in a great story of Triads and cops. Donnie Yen is perfect, and if the film can somehow get Max Zhang (IP Man 3) to play the baddie things would be perfect! My only fear here is that Yen already paid homage to kung-fu films with Kung Fu Killer, so I’m not sure an American production can top that. That and we all know about video game adaptations and how they often fail, even though the game story is already tailor made for a movie. My excitement meter is definitely up. Only Donnie is attached t the moment. Let’s hope they pick the right director. Anyone associated with John Wick 1 and 2 would do nicely. I want my Donnie Yen vs Daniel Bernhardt fight. Make it happen, movie gods.

Hey, wasn’t Donnie supposed to be retiring?!

Source: JoBlo

Remember this awesome trailer for the game? Template’s already in place!

Review: Blindsided (2017)

Posted in Clayton Barber, David No, Eric Jacobus, Roger Yuan on February 28, 2017 by Michael S. Moore

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Starring Eric Jacobus, Roger Yuan, Nicolas Verdi, Brett Sheerin, Khalid Ghajji

Fight Choreography by Roger Yuan

Directed by Clayton Barber

I’ve been gleefully awaiting anything from Eric Jacobus ever since we saw him in Rope-A-Dope 2, and now this filmmaking/martial arts/stuntman badass returns in a film that pays great homage to all of the blind martial arts onscreen fighters over the years, so how does his newest short hold up to everything including his own work?

In short: this is Mr. Jacobus’ best film yet. And that’s really, REALLY saying something.

The film opens as we meet Walter, a blind man with a bit of a problem: he needs milk to go with his apple pie (which looks like the best apple pie I’ve seen in a long time), and goes to his corner market. While shopping there the shop owner (played by the great Roger Yuan!!!) is accosted by a group of thugs, and well, you can probably guess what happens next. I’m not giving it away!

Eric, as always, shows that comedy is his strong suit, and proves it again here, not so much with the character himself, but with the early part of the fight scenes, which remind me of some of Jackie Chan’s best fight scenes using a prop, which in this case is his cane. Roger Yuan looks like he’s having a blast watching the proceedings, and since he’s also the fight choreographer, isn’t that an awesome thing?! The direction by Clayton Barber is spot on, and everyone does a great job packing a lot of character into a very short amount of time. The production values are fantastic as they aways are with Eric’s work, and the fights!

Let’s have a word about that.

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There is only one fight scene in the film, but covers a lot and since weapons are involved it looks technically difficult to shoot, but the quality is there as we see some amazing movements, parries, blocks and strikes are fast and furious, but the excellent camerawork makes sure you know what’s what and who is where at all times.

If I had any real issue with the film is that I wanted more of everything! But that’s for a sequel, isn’t it? And be sure to stick through the credits as you see what training Eric went through to accurately portray a blind gentlemen. Dedication to craft, everybody!

Kiai-Kick’s Grade: 9.5

Eric knocks this one out of the park–again–and Roger Yuan’s fight choreography is on point! This film comes on Youtube March 1st, and I HIGHLY suggest you watch it! So where’s my feature film with Walter? 

You can watch the film March 1st here.

Scott Adkins + Marko Zaror+Cung Le = Savage Dog Trailer! (2017)

Posted in Cung Le, Marko Zaror, Scott Adkins on January 28, 2017 by Michael S. Moore

Oh yeah. This is my jam! Scott Adkins in a period piece? Yes! Scott Adkins and Marko Zaror in a Undisputed rematch! Yes!  One of them vs. Cung Le? Yes! Keith David? Oh hell yes! I don’t know much about fight choreographer Luke LaFontaine, but here’s hoping he brings the goods. I have a few worries about martial arts films in 2017, but this makes me optimistic. Check out the trailer below, and let me know what you think! By the way, Keith David makes anything better.

Review: Above The Law (1988)

Posted in Steven Seagal with tags , on January 13, 2017 by Michael S. Moore

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Starring: Steven Seagal, Pam Grier, Henry Silva, Sharon Stone

Fight Choreography by Steven Seagal

Directed by Andrew Davis

In 1988  martial arts films were going strong, with Jackie Chan, Sammo Hung, Jet Li, Michelle Yeoh ruling the roost. And in the USA we had…an aging Chuck Norris. And that was it. When would another martial artist step forward for America? Enter two films: Bloodsport and Above the Law, the latter of which introduced the world to the martial arts style Aikido and its practitioner, Steven Seagal.

Steven Seagal plays Nico Toscani, a Chicago cop who used to be special forces CIA who got sick of it after witnessing a man being tortured by maniac CIA operative Zagon (Silva) and quits in the middle of the op, because in the 80s you could do that. Now a detective along with his partner Jax (Grier) he gets involved in a drug ring run by Zagon and a group of CIA operatives who are plotting to kill a US Senator who is investigating their clandestine operations (whew!). But when they go after Nico’s family and church, Nico dispenses his own brand of street justice, because as he says “you think you’re above the law. but you ain’t above mine.” Hell yeah 80’s action!

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This film not only made Seagal an action star, but also cemented the style of films he would make: small scale urban justice films, not unlike the Death Wish movies. Seagal is pretty one-note here but does have that elusive on screen charisma. Henry Silvia is, well, Henry Silvia, an always dependable actor when you need a baddie you can hiss at. Pam Grier is okay but she needed to be more than the “put-upon” partner as well as the woman that needs to be protected despite the fact she’s a cop too. This is Pam god****mn Grier. She’ll deliver your dick in a jar to your girlfriend. Surely she could have been presented as more that what she was. Sharon Stone is also in the film in a small role as Nico’s wife, but she doesn’t do much except spending the film trying to get Nico to give up, which means she’s and incredibly annoying character whenever she’s on screen. Andrew Davis does a great job directing here, and his future films Under Siege and The Fugitive would further cement him as a solid film director.

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The opening scene, where Seagal shows off how Aikido works in a dojo is one of the best fight scenes in the film. It really does a great job showing audiences not familiar with the style a little of how it works. The next best fight scene is later in the film, where Seagal takes on a group of thugs in a grocery mart. You can tell the floors are rubber, and many of the moves shown in the beginning are repeated here, but now in a practical setting, but it’s still good. The one thing I didn’t like that will become a staple of many of his movies is that Seagal never fights anyone of a similar skillset, so there is no real challenge. Henry Silva basically gets what I call Getting Seagaled (TM): where the bad guy gets beaten and tossed around like a rag doll, not providing any challenge to the hero whatsoever and dies easily.

Kiai-Kick’s Grade: 8

A good film that shows off the style of Aikido well and gives a strong introduction to a new action hero, and would become a template for the majority of the films in his career. Pam Grier is wasted here, however.